Frequently Asked Questions

Stem Cell & Bone Marrow Transplant

Stem cell transplants are used in the treatment of cancers such as leukaemia, myeloma, lymphoma, and other blood or immune system diseases that affect the bone marrow..

A stem cell transplant, also known as a bone marrow transplant or a hematopoietic stem cell transplant, is a medical procedure that replaces your bone marrow with healthy stem cells. These cells either come from your own body or are taken from a donor..

If you have any questions about stem cell or bone marrow transplants, we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions for our patients. Alternatively, feel free to contact our clinic for more information.
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View All FAQs about Stem Cell / Bone Marrow Transplant
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Acute Myeloid Leukaemia
(AML)

Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is a type of blood cancer that occurs due to the excessive production of a specific type of immature white blood cells (also known as myeloblasts) in the bone marrow. These excess myeloblasts cause overcrowding in the bone marrow, leaving little room for the production of other healthy blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets..

If you have any questions about Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML), we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions for our patients. Alternatively, feel free to contact our clinic for more information.
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View All FAQs about Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML)
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Myeloma

Myeloma is a form of blood cancer that affects the plasma cells in the bone marrow. These cells are normally involved in the defence functions of the immune system and help the body fight infections by producing antibodies..

Myeloma causes accumulation of abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow resulting in the crowding of healthy blood cells. These cancer cells produce abnormal proteins (called paraproteins) instead of healthy antibodies, thus causing severe complications..

Myeloma affects multiple places in the body, which is why it is sometimes referred to as ‘multiple’ myeloma. Myeloma affects where bone marrow is normally active in an adult, such as in the bones of the spine, skull, pelvis, the rib cage, long bones of the arms and legs and the areas around the shoulders and hips..

If you have any questions about Myeloma, we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions for our patients. Alternatively, feel free to contact our clinic for more information.
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View All FAQs about Myeloma
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Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) are a group of diverse bone marrow disorders in which the bone marrow does not produce enough healthy blood cells. MDS is often referred to as a “bone marrow failure disorder”. MDS is primarily a disease of the elderly, but MDS can affect younger patients as well..

In the early stages, patients can have low blood counts or may need blood transfusions. But at more advanced stages, patients have a condition which is not dissimilar to Acute Myeloid Leukaemia..

If you have any questions about Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS), we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions for our patients. Alternatively, feel free to contact our clinic for more information.
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View All FAQs about Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL)

ALL is the most common type of cancer in children and accounts for 20% of blood cancers in adults. It is a type of blood cancer which leads to the overproduction of abnormal white blood cells called lymphoblasts.

These lymphoblasts circulate in the bloodstream and infiltrate the body’s bone marrow, lymph glands and other organs. As a result, the normal function of the bone marrow is affected, leading to poor production of red cells, normal white cells and platelets. If left untreated, it is usually fatal within 3 months of diagnosis.

If you have any questions about Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL), we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions for our patients. Alternatively, feel free to contact our clinic for more information.

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View All FAQs about Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL)

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Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that begins in the cells of the lymphatic system which is responsible for fighting disease and infection. It affects the infection-fighting cells of the immune system known as lymphocytes. There are two types of lymphocytes called B cells and T cells. These cells have the ability to recognise and destroy infectious microorganisms and abnormal cells. Because the immune system is found throughout the body, lymphoma can begin almost anywhere.
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Lymphoma occurs when the lymphocytes multiply abnormally and collect at specific parts of the lymphatic system, such as the lymph nodes, bone marrow and spleen. These affected lymphocytes also lose their infection-fighting ability making the body more vulnerable to infection.
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If you have any questions about Lymphoma, we have compiled a list of frequently asked questions for our patients. Alternatively, feel free to contact our clinic for more information.
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View All FAQs about Myeloma

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Disclaimer:
The information on the Centre For Clinical Haematology website is intended for educational use.  It should not be considered or used as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment from a qualified health professional.
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Locations

Contact

WhatsApp : +65 9376 7221
Email : contact@cfch.com.sg
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Consultation Hours

Monday to Friday : 8.30am – 5.30pm
Saturday : 8.30am – 12.30pm
Closed on Sunday & Public Holidays

 

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Disclaimer | 2022 Centre For Clinical Haematology

Website Created by Cleveraa

Locations

Contact

WhatsApp : +65 9376 7221
Email : contact@cfch.com.sg
.

Consultation Hours

Monday to Friday : 8.30am – 5.30pm
Saturday : 8.30am – 12.30pm
Closed on Sunday & Public Holidays

Find us on Facebook

Drop a Line

If you have any questions about your condition or would like to make an appointment, simply fill up the form and we'll contact you as soon as we can

Disclaimer | 2022 Centre For Clinical Haematology | Website Created by Cleveraa